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Carburetion
Carburetion, Page 2
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THIS IS AS GOOD A PLACE AS ANY TO TELL YOU TO NEVER SOAK THESE CARBURETORS IN CARBURETOR CLEANER/COLD PARTS CLEANER OR HYDRA-SEAL TYPE PRODUCTS. Those products are typically a ‘basket’ type dip aluminum cleaner that will take the meat off your hands and is still available despite our friends at the EPA. It will also take the protective finish off the carburetors and they will corrode and grow things that are unidentifiable!  Use a spray carb cleaner like SUPER TECH 2000 ™ from Wal Mart; it’s cheap, cleans like the dickens, takes paint off and will remove your eye so be careful….but will not harm the finish. If the carb is stained and really nasty, your choices are, leave it stained but clean or have it restored, re-plated or re-finished…  (go to harms.com or see our next installment…)   

For the competition minded, we can get a quicker bowl fill by bypassing the long and restrictive distance of the needle valve and get immediate filling as soon as the needle is even slightly out of the seat orifice. This enables even less float drop as well as lower fuel pressure to the carburetor. It is accomplished by either drilling a small hole into the side of the seat intersecting the well just above the seat itself where the needle seals the fuel off.  (Extreme care and deburring is necessary) OR a flat slot can be machined in the side with an 1/8” end mill which will intersect the body and have a nice approach.

An easy to build fixture must be constructed to do the deed. Before the hole or slot is made, the seat should be installed in the carburetor top snuggly and the position marked where the seat is adjacent to the tin tab that is riveted to the carb top. That’s where you want the fuel to spew out, sort of a splash guard that will cause the least problems.

SHOOTERS/SQUIRTERS

These things have changed as the years have gone by but the short version of the story goes like this… Buy a kit from Edelbrock that contains an .043” squirter and use it, or if you have an Edelbrock carb with a .024 or larger, chuck up a .040” drill bit in the drill press, use some WD40, hold the squirter in your hands and drill the tubes yourself-just be careful to not punch through. That size gives the perfect balance of volume and velocity that splashes against the booster helping atomize the fuel. It helps immensely in eliminating stumble. In this regard, be sure you have .500” pump shot as measured from the tip of the accelerator pump to the top of the cover. Bend, fold and mutilate as necessary to have smooth working linkage after you have installed your max wedge throttle arms.

JETTING AND OTHER SPECIFICATIONS:

No matter who you listen to, whoever you get your tips or ‘hot set-up’ from, what I am about to tell you absolutely works and nothing has been proven to be better on the max wedge manifold. Hot weather, cold weather, altitude, humidity or under water, nothing seems to have much effect on the jetting. Maybe you can eke out a thousandth or two or a shade of color on the plugs only perceptible under an electron microscope, but for all intents and purposes, follow this formula and you will have an extremely accurate metering system that works always, and is ESPECIALLY friendly in the most important area, instant response off idle and drivability.

JETTING IS THE SAME ON BOTH CARBURETORS (although there may be some disagreement-ignore it)
EDELBROCK/CARTER THIN BLADE COMPETITION LATE CARBURETORS
600/625CFM-Primary Jets .098”/.098” (.071”/.047” Rod) / Secondary Jets:  Throttle .089” Choke .082” thin throttle blade angle/Primary 0/Secondary 5
750CFM-Primary Jets .104”/.104” (.071”/.047”Rod)/ Secondary Jets: Throttle .095”
Choke .086”  throttle blade angle-Primary 0/Secondary 5
CARTER OE MAX WEDGE AND OTHER EARLY AFB 500CFM/600 AND 750CFM THICK BLADE
500/600/CFM-Primary Jets .095”/.095” (.071”/.047” Rod)/ Secondary Jets Throttle .086”  Choke .080”  thick throttle blade angle Primary 0/Secondary 12
750CFM-Primary Jets .101”/.101” (.071”/.047” Rod)/Secondary Jets Throttle .089” Choke .077”
thick throttle blade angle-Primary 0/Secondary 5
SOMETHING ON JETS: DON’T GORILLA THE JETS. IT ISN’T NECESSARY. THEY WON’T FALL OUT. MAYBE A DAB OF NEVER SEIZE ON THE THREADS AND JUST A TEENEY SNUG. THEY HAVE A TENDENCY TO WELD THEMSELVES IN THERE. SAVE YOUR CARBURETORS!

NOW all that being said, and having polled several of my racer friends and carburetor builder buddies, there is no clear consensus on the perfect jetting, but we could swap carbs between us and it is unlikely that we would see much if any difference. The answer to this phenomenon lies in the poor design of the factory crossram manifold. (Did I say that?) My approach is to concentrate on smooth and accurate drivability with no lay down, no noises, instant starts and clean acceleration. The rest seems to take care of itself.



 

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